GMC Canyon Expands Capability with New Duramax Diesel

All-new turbo-diesel powertrain enables unmatched 7,700-lb. trailering capability

DETROIT – 07.28.2015 – GMC introduced the 2016 Canyon diesel today – featuring an all-new powertrain that expands the Canyon’s already class-leading capabilities, including trailering capacity of up to 7,700 pounds (3,492 kg).

The new 2.8L Duramax diesel, SAE-certified at 181 horsepower (135 kW) and 369 lb-ft of torque (500 Nm), is estimated to deliver greater highway fuel economy than the Canyon’s segment-topping gas engines, and is the cleanest diesel truck engine ever from General Motors. It goes on sale this fall.

Several new technologies and supporting features complement the Duramax diesel’s capability while helping ensure GMC’s trademark refinement:

  • Standard Hydra-Matic 6L50 six-speed automatic transmission matched with a Centrifugal Pendulum Vibration Absorber in the torque converter, which reduces powertrain noise and vibration
  • Smart diesel exhaust brake system that enhances vehicle control and reduces brake wear on steep grades
  • An all-new integrated trailer brake controller is standard and exclusive on diesel models
  • A new, electronically controlled two-speed transfer case on 4WD models.

“The new Duramax diesel takes the GMC Canyon’s award-winning capabilities to a new level in its segment,” said Duncan Aldred, vice president of GMC Sales and Marketing.

The new Duramax diesel is offered on SLE and SLT Crew Cab models, with 2WD or 4WD. It is priced $3,730 more than a comparably equipped Canyon V-6 model.

All diesel-equipped models feature the Trailering package, which includes a hitch receiver and seven-pin connector, as well as the segment-exclusive automatic locking rear differential, a 3.42 rear axle ratio and four-wheel disc brakes with Duralife™ brake rotors. Capacities include:

  • Maximum trailering rating of 7,700 pounds (3,492 kg) for 2WD models and 7,600 pounds (3,447 kg) for 4WD
  • Gross Vehicle Weight Ratings of 6,000 pounds (2,721 kg) for 2WD and 6,200 pounds (2,812 kg) for 4WD.

A fully boxed frame provides the strength to enable the capabilities of the new Duramax diesel while supporting a ride designed to be smooth and quiet. Like the full-size Sierra’s frame, Canyon features three sections – or bays – with specific strength and support characteristics, including a front bay made of hydroformed side rails and an integrated four-point front axle mounting system designed to reduce vibration.

“A diesel engine was part of the Canyon’s portfolio plan from the beginning, meaning the chassis, suspension and other elements of its architecture were engineered to support it,” said Scott Yackley, assistant chief engineer. “That means there are no compromises with the Canyon diesel. It offers exceptional capability delivered with a confident feeling of control.”

When it comes to putting that capability to use, the GMC Canyon offers helpful cargo features such as the standard CornerStep rear bumper, two-tier cargo bed loading, 13 standard movable tie-downs in the cargo bed, an available factory spray-in bed liner and the EZ Lift-and-Lower tailgate.

In addition, the 2016 Canyon offers technologies and connectivity features such as GMC IntelliLink with new phone integration technology – and Apple CarPlay capability – OnStar 4G LTE with Wi-Fi hotspot, Lane Departure Warning and Forward Collision Alert.

All-new 2.8L Duramax turbo-diesel details
Canyon’s new 2.8L Duramax turbo-diesel is part of General Motors’ global family of turbo-diesel four-cylinder engines designed to deliver capability and efficiency. It features a variable-geometry turbocharger for optimal power and efficiency across the rpm band and a balance shaft for greater smoothness.

Power is SAE-certified at 181 horsepower (135 kW) at 3,400 rpm and 369 lb-ft of torque (500 Nm) at 2,000 rpm. A broad torque band makes it very powerful at low rpm while the turbocharged performance provides a confident feeling of immediate and smooth horsepower on demand.

“The new 2.8L Duramax was designed specifically for trucks and has undergone many of the same validation tests as the 6.6L Duramax offered in the GMC Sierra HD models, advancing the Duramax brand’s legacy of durability and reliability,” said Yackley.

Additional engine features:

  • Iron cylinder block and aluminum DOHC cylinder head
  • Forged steel crankshaft and connecting rods
  • Oiling circuit that includes a dedicated feed for the turbocharger to provide increased pressure at the turbo and faster oil delivery
  • Piston-cooling oil jets
  • 16.5:1 compression ratio
  • Common rail direct injection fuel system
  • Ceramic glow plugs for shorter heat-up times and higher glow temperatures
  • Balance shaft that contributes to smoothness and drives the oil pump
  • Laminated steel oil pan with upper aluminum section that contributes to engine rigidity and quietness
  • B20 bio-diesel capability.

The Duramax 2.8L is the cleanest diesel truck engine ever produced by GM and meets some of the toughest U.S. emissions standards, thanks in part to a cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system.

The cooled EGR contributes to lower emissions by diverting some of the engine-out exhaust gas and mixing it back into the fresh intake air stream, which is drawn into the cylinder head for combustion. That lowers combustion temperatures and rates, improving emissions performance by reducing the formation of NOx.

Smart exhaust brake details
The Canyon’s integrated, driver-selectable exhaust brake system is based on the system introduced on the 2015 Sierra HD models and uses the compression power of the 2.8L Duramax engine to improve vehicle control and reduce brake pad wear.

When the exhaust brake is engaged in cruise mode, exhaust cruise grade braking helps the cruise control system maintain the desired downhill vehicle speed, keeping the driver from having to apply the brakes and exit cruise control to maintain speed.

When the exhaust brake is engaged in non-cruise mode, the transmission and the exhaust brake deliver the correct amount of braking to assist in vehicle control, regardless of vehicle load. It is a smart system that varies the amount of braking needed for the vehicle, load and grade. The engagement of the system is smooth and quiet, while its performance enhances the driver’s feeling of control.

CPVA contributes to refinement
The Centrifugal Pendulum Vibration Absorber (CPVA) in the torque converter is designed to control vibration and noise. It is an absorbing damper with a set of secondary spring masses, that — when energized — cancels out the engine’s torsional vibrations so the driver and passengers can’t feel them.

In its unique design, the spring masses vibrate in the opposite direction of the torsional vibrations of the engine, balancing out undesirable torsional vibrations. Its use in the Canyon marks the first application of a CPVA in GM vehicles and its first use in the midsize truck segment.

Critical acclaim
In 2015, Canyon won Cars.com’s Midsize Pickup Challenge for its segment-leading capabilities and efficiency, including the latest in safety features, cargo-hauling and trailering versatility. Cars.com also complimented the Canyon SLT, the segment’s only premium vehicle, for its performance with a full load, as well as its design and use of high-end materials.

Autoweek honored Canyon as the “Best of the Best Truck for 2015,” and Wards Auto World recognized Canyon as one of Ward’s 10 Best Interiors for 2015, based on criteria such as design harmony, ergonomics, materials, driver information, safety and comfort.

NOTE: Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price includes destination charges, but excludes tax, title, license, optional equipment and dealer fees.

GMC Paving Way to Smarter and Safer Driving at All-New Active Safety Test Area

22 crash-avoidance technologies offered on 2016 GMC models

MILFORD, Mich.07.24.2015 – Chevy, Buick, GMC and Cadillac will offer 22 different active safety technologies across their 2016 model year U.S. lineups, ranging from driver alerts to those that automatically intervene and assist the driver in critical situations.

Safety engineers will develop and test these and other safety technologies for products around the world at GM’s new, 52-acre Active Safety Test Area at its Milford Proving Ground near Detroit. The $14 million facility officially opened Friday.

“Our comprehensive safety strategy of helping customers before, during and after a crash continues,” said Jeff Boyer, vice president of GM Global Vehicle Safety. “GM historically has been a leader in the development and testing of safety technologies, and applying our deep knowledge and expertise to prevent crashes from happening in the first place.”

Examples of available crash-avoidance technologies for 2016 GM models include:

  • City Speed Front Automatic Braking: If the vehicle is traveling at a low speed and the system detects that a front-end collision situation is imminent while following a detected vehicle and the driver has not already applied the brakes, the system automatically applies brakes to help reduce the collision’s severity. The system may even help avoid the collision at very low speeds.
  • Front Pedestrian Braking: If the system detects that a pedestrian is directly ahead and a collision is imminent, and the driver has not already applied the brakes, the system alerts the driver and, if necessary, automatically applies the brakes to help reduce the collision’s severity or avoid the collision.
  • Rear Camera Mirror: Compared to a traditional inside rearview mirror, this rear view mirror display provides a wider, less obstructed field of view to assist when driving, changing lanes, and checking for vehicles and traffic conditions.
  • Night Vision: Provides the driver an infrared night vision image of the area lit beyond the headlamps that highlights and provides alerts to detected pedestrians or large animals.
  • Curb View Camera: When in Forward gear during low-speed maneuvering (e.g., parking),  this system provides the driver a view of the scene immediately ahead of the vehicle on the vehicle’s center stack display to help the driver avoid low-speed collisions into nearby objects, such as curbs, poles, and parked vehicles.

“The technologies we are developing and testing at this facility are available to our customers across our GM brands,” said Cynthia Bay, director of Active Safety Electronics and Controls. “Front Pedestrian Braking will be offered on the 2016 Chevy Malibu, and the lowest-priced Chevy we offer in the U.S. – the new 2016 Chevy Spark – has available Lane Departure Warning and Forward Collision Alert.”

The new Active Safety Test Area concentrates the company’s active safety testing into one, state-of-the-art site. It features:

  • A 16-acre dynamics pad for testing a variety of robot-controlled and automated vehicles.
  • Highway simulation with six lanes, on/off ramps, controlled lighting and road signs that represent specifications around the world.
  • A parking test area with different curb types and landscaping detection.
  • Pedestrian test area with a 90-degree traffic intersection and specially designed rig for accurate dummy movement.
  • Simulated tunnel with walls and posts.
  • A building for observation, indoor testing, hoists for test preparation and a robotic control station.

Bay said the facility is ideal for testing vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technologies, which will be standard on the 2017 Cadillac CTS.

“In addition to helping customers all over the world avoid crashes, many of the technologies we develop and test here are integral to our ongoing V2V communications work and even the development of future autonomous vehicles,” she said.

The V2V dedicated short-range radio communication enables vehicles to “talk” to each other and exchange basic safety data such as speed, location and braking status. It complements existing safety components like radar, camera and ultrasonic sensors; some of the components rigorously tested at the new Active Safety Test Area facility, in a fast and efficient way.

The facility is also used to assess performance in regulatory and insurance industry consumer metric tests, such as those conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Euro New Car Assessment Program (NCAP), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and others.

“General Motors is committed to setting a new standard for global product safety, and developing vehicles that continue to provide leading safety technologies which can help drivers avoid crashes,” said Boyer. “This facility will accelerate GM’s development and testing of innovative safety technologies.”

GMC Sierra HD Leads Segment in J.D. Power APEAL Study

Terrain places second in Compact SUV category

DETROIT – 07.22.2015 – Underscoring its appeal to discerning owners of full-size pickups, the 2015 GMC Sierra HD led the Large Heavy Duty Pickup segment in the 2015 J.D. Power U.S. Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout (APEAL) Study released today. The 2015 GMC Terrain placed second in the Compact SUV category.

The APEAL Study examines – through consumer surveys – how gratifying a new vehicle is to own and drive. Owners evaluate their vehicle across 77 attributes, which make up an overall brand score measured on a 1,000-point scale.

“These and similar awards affirm that our customers recognize and appreciate the precision engineering, design and technology that go into every GMC,” said Duncan Aldred, U.S. vice president, GMC. “Sierra HD trucks are engineered without compromise to deliver the capability, refinement and technology that inspire confidence with every task.”

Because many owners of heavy duty pickups use them for hauling and towing, GMC paid special attention to features that promote greater driving confidence and comfort on long trips, such as integrated cruise control and auto grade braking. They help drivers maintain a set speed up and down grades, even when towing a heavy trailer in mountainous terrain.

On Sierra HDs equipped with the available Duramax diesel engine, the driver can also engage the diesel exhaust brake, which uses the variable vanes in the turbocharger to smoothly and quietly create additional backpressure in the engine to help slow the vehicle. The combination of the exhaust brake and the automatic transmission downshifts helps maintain the desired speed, even on long, steep highway downgrades.

A standard rear-vision camera system provides a view of items behind the vehicle and can assist with lining up in front of a trailer.

In June, 48 percent of Sierra HD retail sales were Denali HDs.

The Terrain remains a favorite in the compact crossover segment, introducing customers to the brand’s premium design and luxury features. Customer connectivity in the 2015 Sierra HD and Terrain includes GMC’s IntelliLink infotainment system, along with OnStar with 4GLTE and built-in WiFi hotspot, providing a mobile hub for drivers and passengers to stay connected.